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Dean Stockton is an English multimedia street artist who uses spray paint, stickers, posters, and stencils. “D*Face”, a.k.a. Dean Stockton, grew up in London and had a childhood interest in graffiti. He credits this to Henry Chalfant’s coverage of subway graffiti in New York City in Spraycan Art and Subway Art, later as a teenager skateboarding and in particular Thrasher magazine’s coverage of skateboard deck graphics led his interest in stickers and the DIY mentality associated with skate and punk fanzines. He attended an illustration and design course and worked as a freelance illustrator/designer whilst honing his street work. Influences included Shepard Fairey’s “Obey Giant” art campaign, Jim Philips, hip hop, punk music, and popular animated cartoons.[1]
He held his first major London solo exhibition, Death & Glory, at the Stolenspace gallery, which sold out in October 2006.[2] Since then, his exhibitions have included a solo show, Eyecons, at O Contemporary in Brighton in March 2007, again a sell out show. This featured new paintings, an installation and two prints — of Kurt “Kant Complain” and Cli-Che.[3] read more

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This is Stik, paint-splattered and hard at work in the Mile End Arts Pavilion on some material for his solo show back in 2010.  He’s been creating Stik in various forms for 10 years now. You’ll find his work mainly around Hackney Wick, Dalston and Shoreditch –  Stik people resting, dancing, entire Stik families bringing life to neglected walls or empty billboards. Recently, Stik’s been branching out, with people in other parts of London asking him to graffiti Stik on their walls, working at Glasto and putting up a few pieces in Bristol. He even did a campaign for British Waterways. read more

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 MUGA, a Belgian street artist recently participated in the exhibition ” Seen on walls in Belgium, his hometown, alongside artists such as Obey, Swoon, Space Invader, Jef Aerosol, Evol and more. MUGA utilizes stencils, collages, and past ups, mixing different kinds of materials and colors, full of details and meaning. His artwork is directly playing with the urban environment and has no lack of humor, critics or poetry.

Muga Onair is a very active representative of neograffiti. He was born and grew up in Namur (an hour out of Brussels), and he is currently living and working between Marseille and Brussels. He first started taking interest in aerosol at the time when Belgium saw the rising of the Hip Hop movement. Very early on, he turned towards “stencil” which he practices since 1996.
We are invited to observe these elements as a critique of our society, of images around us, publicity, discourses, media or technology. Muga has left traces of his art in many cities in Belgium, as well as in Paris, Marseille, Berlin, Amsterdam, and in the countries he has travelled to: Mali, Canary Islands, Sri Lanka, India… read more

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Tec, born in Cordoba, Argentina.The artist currently lives in São Paulo, Brasil.His artistic trajectory can be divided in three periods. The artist stayed in his hometown until the age of fifteen and then moved to Buenos Aires where he had his first contact with art. That moment, Tec, started painting the walls of the streets of the capital of Argentina promoting his rock band, Ocote. From that moment, the artist created dialoguing directly with the football universe, the rock bands and the graphite in its inscription shape calligraphed. He signed his work using two pseudonyms: Sade and Tec. With time he decided to stay only with Tec. The second moment of his career happened when he entered in college of graphic design at university of Buenos Aires. read more

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 Trek Matthews is a young Atlanta-based artist whom I have had the pleasure of getting to know through his work with Living Walls. Through complete coincidence, Tim Hans ran into Trek on a Brooklyn rooftop earlier this year. So we interview him…

Let’s talk about your experience as an artist who also works on the streets. How did you start painting outside?

I’m gonna tell a short story to answer this. Basically one summer, when I recently had moved into this city, I think it was the second year of Living Walls but it was the first year that I heard of it. There was a call for volunteers and I got involved and it was rad. I assisted for Gaia and Nanook and Sam Parker and it was super super rad. I had seen their work before cause I had always been passively interested in seeing what they were doing at that time. I decided to keep going with it, and kept hanging out and trying out new things. At that time I was part of the graphic design program at a university, and then shifted the focus to drawing and started to bring that to a certain direction, with no intention of painting, until Living Walls approached me with a project. Until that point I had not done anything large at all, I hadn’t painted on a wall, or at all. I started practicing and experimenting anywhere I could, then I did my first wall a couple of weeks later. So it pushed me really quickly. Then I tried to adapt my aesthetics to different situations and aspects. read more

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I recently had the opportunity to interview Emma Arnold, founder of the Institute for Art and Environment. The I-AE is an organisation which focuses on the role of art within an environmental discourse. Quite simply, it’s “part art project, part geographical study.” I’ve followed Arnold’s website and Instagram for some time, and have been impressed with her documentation of Montreal’s urban art community. Keep reading to discover what led this Environmental Studies Graduate to pursue her passion for mapping Montreal’s street art. =&0=& The I-AE was born out of a mix of love and frustration: a love of art and a frustration that in the environmental field more attention is not paid to arts and culture. In the environmental sector, there is a very strong art/science divide and I wanted to try and bridge that divide through my research. =&1=& Professionally, I consider myself a cultural geographer and at times an environmental philosopher. But I am also an artist – an illustrator – and I bring my passion for art to everything I do. I believe that my mixed background in the arts and sciences is part of what makes this research innovative and interesting. In some ways, I take a very scientific approach to my research but I also understand art and the techniques and skill involved in graffiti and street art. =&2=& I try not to define street art. Instead, I take a pretty broad approach in my research. I take photographs of anything that was left there by someone else. These might be tags, stickers, paintings, drawings, wheatpastes, sculptures, messages, anything really. =&3=& Because of the nature of my field research – walking outside and taking photographs – it often depends on the weather and the light. A typical day of fieldwork involves randomly picking a neighbourhood and walking around with my camera. Part of my research involves trying to get lost in neighbourhoods so I do not usually have much of a plan in mind when I go out. On a good day, I’ll cover 10-15km on foot and take about 100-500 photographs. So far, I have walked over 500 km and taken thousands of photographs. The rest of my time is usually spent at my laptop. I map my routes, edit photographs, and upload images to my website and to Instagram (@artandenvironment). I also spend time doing research, writing papers, and lecturing or presenting at conferences. And with what time is left in the day, I draw and paint and make my own art. =&4=&
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